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Hidden Gems of Mazatlan

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As we’ve recently reported, the U.S. State Department has revamped their state department advisory system. There’s now a state department advisory for every country in the world, with ratings broken down into four categories– travel with normal caution, travel with increased precautions, reconsider travel and number four, do not travel. A number of Mexican states, including the state of Sinaloa, is now labeled a category four “DO NOT TRAVEL” destination. But what’s in Sinaloa? Mazatlan, one of my favorite destinations. Is the State Department appearing to put Mazatlan in the same basket as Syria, Yemen and Afghanistan? That’s absurd. And to prove it, I ignored the State Department advisory and flew down to Mazatlan. In fact, I’ve been going down there since I was 23. And yes, I went there safely and returned safely…No…problemo. And here are a few of my hidden gems of Mazatlan.

Angela Peralta Theater

The theater originally opened in 1874 and operated continuously until 1964 when it fell into disrepair.  It was slated for demolition in the mid 1980s, but the city decided to save it from the wrecking ball, and today it is one of Mazatlan’s most important cultural treasures.

Centro Historico 

The surrounding plaza and cobblestone streets of the Centro Historico are filled with art galleries, bars, boutiques, sidewalk cafes and restaurants–making this a great place to walk around and take in the sights. But if you get tired of walking, you can always hop on a Pulmonia, the iconic little taxis that you’ll see all around the city that are unique to Mazatlan.

Malecon

There are a few things you should know about the Malecon, the longest boardwalk in Latin America. One, it’s four miles long and you can ride it the whole way. Second, everyone from Yul Brynner to John Wayne, Jack Kerouac and even Herman Melville hung out here. And number three…so much of the architecture that was here while they were here is still preserved today.

Amaitlán Botanical Garden 

This five acre botanical garden is part of a prototype for a proposed sustainable tourist city. Here you’ll find native flowers, plants, fruit trees and birds in five botanical environments, including butterfly and cactus gardens.

 
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