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Radio Guest List––EAST Miami––August 12, 2017

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This week, the Peter Greenberg Worldwide Radio Show broadcasts from the EAST Miami in Florida. Miami is home to a bustling art scene, vibrant nightlife, and world-class shopping. The Port of Miami also serves five million travelers annually, cementing the city’s reputation as the “Cruise Capital of the World.” On this week’s episode, Peter Greenberg explains what you need to know to avoid lost luggage on overseas flights, and looks into what the FAA’s investigation on shrinking airline seats means for travelers. Mark Hatfield, Chief Security Officer at Miami International Airport, talks about the crazy items—and animals—confiscated at airport security, the laptop ban, and what’s next for customs’ screening procedures. Jose Izquierdo, a member of the board at the Gold Coast Railroad museum, talks about how trains shaped Miami’s history. Carlos Frias, Food and Dining Editor at the Miami Herald, talks about the explosion of Peruvian restaurants in Miami and shares where to get the best Cuban food in the city. Lisa Leone, Vice President of Artistic Programs at National Youngarts Foundation, talks about what’s next for Miami’s vibrant art scene. Maruchi Mendez and Roxanne Vargas, authors of 100 Things to Do In Miami Before You Die, reveal what’s on their Miami bucket lists—and what they’d add to the second edition. There’s all of this and more as the Peter Greenberg Worldwide Radio Show broadcasts from the EAST Miami in Florida.

Click here to listen to the show streaming live from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. ET on Saturday, August 12, 2017.

Have a travel question? Ask Peter. Email him at peter@petergreenberg.com, post on his Facebook page, or tweet your questions to @PeterSGreenberg.

Mark Hatfield, Assistant Aviation Director and Chief Security Officer at Miami International Airport, talks about how he started his career as the Federal Security Director for the TSA in 2007. Then, he goes through the most surprising items—and animals—confiscated at airport security. He also talks about the lingering confusion surrounding TSA’s liquid rules. Even though it’s been more than 10 years since the 3-1-1 rule became official, people are still not sure what counts as a liquid. Later, he talks about what’s next for airport security, including future plans to change the standard questions asked at U.S. customs and the ramifications of the laptop ban.

Jose Izquierdo, Board Member of the Gold Coast Railroad Museum, gives a quick history lesson on how Henry Flagler’s railroad shaped Miami into the city we know today. Then he gives a rundown on the wide array of trains on display at the Gold Coast Railroad Museum, such as California Zephyr observation cars, a car from the presidential train (which had a secret underground station at the Waldorf Astoria), and two engines from NASA.

Carlos Frias, Food & Dining Editor at the Miami Herald, reveals why Miami restaurateurs are loving Peruvian food with an Asian twist. He also delves into all the new chefs and artisans opening their first restaurants in the city, such as local breadmaster Zach the Baker. He also discusses what makes the perfect Cuban bread, and why anyone visiting Miami needs to get their hands on a frita (Cuban hamburger).

Lisa Leone, Vice President of Artistic Programs at the National Youngarts Foundation, talks about how the ultra-competitive National Youngarts Foundation nurtures Miami’s up-and-coming artists, as well as the artists and choreographers the Foundation will work with this fall. She also talks about why the Foundation’s YoungArts Week in January, a community-centered art festival, is a must-see for any Miami visitor.

Meg Daly, Founder of the Underline, discusses the ten-mile-long linear park her foundation is building below the Miami metro-rail, including her plans for the park as a hub for public art and free exercise classes. She also goes into the difficulties the Underline faces, including Miami’s lack of public transport and fundraising challenges. However, she notes that the Underline reflects Miami residents’ desires to become a more walking-friendly city.

John Richard, President and CEO of the Adrienne Arsht Center, talks about how the 11-year-old Adrienne Arsht fits into Miami’s thriving arts scene that is quickly becoming the center of the Miami experience, and how it is quickly becoming an icon of Miami culture. He also notes the large range of guests that perform at the center, ranging from the top ballet companies in the world to comedian Louis C.K. Finally, he talks about the rapid transformation of the city over the past 30 years.

Maruchi Mendez & Roxanne Vargas, Authors of 100 Things to Do in Miami Before You Die, sit down to talk about all things Miami: where to get the best burger, Miami’s booming vinyl scene, the excitement that the Miami River offers, and where to go for crabs if you’re not in the mood to brave the line at at Joe’s. They also talk about the difficulty of choosing just 100 things for their book and go into the hidden gems that didn’t quite make the cut. Plus, they reveal which Miami drag show will be included in a second edition of their book.

Giovanni Beretta, EAST Miami General Manager and VP of Swire Hotels, discusses the 200-year history of the Swire company, as well as how they got started in the hotel business by opening its first property for the 2008 Beijing Olympics. He also talks about why Swire was initially interested in Miami, as well as how the relationship between the revitalized Brickell City Center and East Miami works.

Chef Nano, Executive Chef of Quinto La Huella, sits down to talk about his long career in the food industry, including a tenure at Soho House. He also talks about how Argentinean and Uruguayan culture, as well as the local seafood in Miami, shapes the menu at Quinto La Huella. He also notes the surprises that he encountered when designing the menu for his restaurant, including the pork dish that tanked and the local fish dish that became a runaway hit.

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